Tag Archives: creative

No Sleep for Local Agencies in 24 Hours of Pro-Bono EventSponsored by Scofield

Several members of Rise Innovations will be taking place in this charity event.

The following is a press release from Publicis Indianapolis.

INDIANAPOLIS (Jan. 20, 2011) — Three local advertising agencies and one student team aredonating their talent and their sleep during the American Advertising Federation’s (AAF) 2nd annual24 Hours of Pro-Bono event. The participating agencies will be partnered with a local not-for-profit and have 24 hours to create an advertising campaign that meets the goals and needs of theorganization. If the talented addies are still awake, they will present their creative campaigns topeers, the public and the nonprofit organizations at 6 p.m., on Thursday Jan. 27 at the IndianapolisCentral Library. All creative designs and concepts will be donated to the nonprofits.

This year students from the Butler University Center for Strategic Communication for Nonprofitswill be participating in the event with the professionals. The students will be lead by professors,but will have the opportunity to create and present with the agencies. Participating agencies includePublicis Indianapolis, Hirons & Company and Matchbook Creative.
The nonprofits featured are:• The John P. Craine House• Trusted Mentors Inc.• Worthmore Academy• Binford Redevelopment and Growth Inc.
The event is open to the public and tickets are $5 for AAF members and $10 for the public. Beerand wine will be served after the presentation along with light hors’doeuvres. Sponsors for the eventinclude Scofield as title sponsor, IMS Productions and Lamar Advertising donated in kind servicesfor each of the nonprofits and EPI Marketing Services provided printed materials for the event.
What: 24 Hour Pro-Bono
When: 6 p.m., Thursday Jan. 27
Where: The Indianapolis Public Library,
Cost: $5 for AAF members and $10 for the public

 

M edia Contact:Alicia Hammonds, Publicis(317) 644-8102alicia.hammonds@publicis-usa.com

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Why PR?

Upon my High School graduation, and going to college I had no clue what I wanted to do.  I thought of all the really cool majors I could have, and what it is that I want to do with the rest of my life.  After some close thought when entering college I for sure thought that marketing is what I wanted to do, and even narrower sports marketing.

My classes in the school of business my freshmen year were really interesting, but for some reason I just didn’t feel like it was the correct fit for me.  I really liked the marketing portion, but decided the school of business was just not for me, and shortly after I became a public relations major.

I love to write, and be creative, but did not want to be a journalist, and when talking to my friend who was a public relations major it seemed that it was the perfect fit.  The following semester I took my first PR class, and absolutely fell in love!  We were writing press releases, designing brochures, and even got some real hands on experience with public relations in the final four!  After that class I knew that I was finally in the right field and in the right school.  I could do anything I wanted with my major, and PR is used in such a variety of fields from sports to medicine.

Now that I am knee deep into my major, I have not only learned a lot, but have found how PR is all around me.  I love how I can make connections from class to what I see during my day to day life.

-Alex Runjo

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Push That Envelope…or Dollar Bill

Class has been in session for just under a month. My brain has shifted from constantly being stimulated by the designs surrounding me at my summer internship back to late night study sessions where my best friends include my text book and Starbucks. At my internship this summer one of my favorite things we would do is have inspirational meetings where each of us had to bring something that inspired us design wise. I always enjoyed this time because it grounded me and reminded me of why I love design so much. It fascinates me to see how other people can look at something in a totally different perspective than I can.

So on Sunday night while I was procrastinating my homework, I decided to rejuvenate my creative juices and stumbled upon the Dollar ReDe$ign Project, whose mission is to rebrand the US Dollar. When I saw this article I immediately clicked on it because how would you even go about rebranding the US Dollar? I mean is this even legal? The US dollar has been one of our nation’s signatures since the 1930s. That is the exact reason that I loved this idea though, because I never would have thought of it.

There is such a wide variety of styles and possible branding directions that have been submitted for this year’s competition, but I’m definitely drawn towards the designs titled ‘Relative Value’ by Dowling Duncan. The neon colors really make the bills pop, and the vertical layout is unexpected. I also like how not just presidents are featured on the bill faces. It gives a more thorough representation of our nation’s history. Another one of my favorites has the bills formatted like movie tickets, bar codes included, which gives them an over simplistic feel that is unique.

Also here’s a fun fact: according to Dollar ReDe$ign’s poll, Captain Jack Sparrow and Barack Obama were voted as the favorites to appear on the new dollar bill design. I would have to look at Johnny Depp’s face forever printed on the dollar? I wouldn’t mind. And with Britney Spears being voted as the performer to sing the Star Spangled Banner at the ReDe$ign launch party, I’m for sure there if I’m “Lucky” enough to get invited.

Aside from the odd polls and claims that this dollar revamp will boost our economy, I took something away from this site. You can’t stay inside the lines if you want to make an impact. Submitting a green rectangle with a past president’s face on it is not going to win the competition. In order to make a difference you have to push the envelope in anything you do whether it is public relations, advertising, or design. So the next time you’re in a rut take a time out to be inspired by something that’s outside of your perspective.

For more about the Dollar ReDe$ign Project visit their homepage.

-Erin Hammeran

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Strange Opportunities Can Reveal Strengths

I didn’t get the summer internship I was hoping for, and I won’t lie and say I wasn’t disappointed in going back to my old summer job. But then a strange opportunity came my way.

My mom is an account at an answering service company in Green Bay, and they were looking to hire someone for a direct marketing campaign.  My mom went out on a limb and suggested my name, and I got the job!  So, despite my initial set back, I was going to be able to get creative this summer making a sales flyer, brochure and direct mail postcards for the company.

I got started on the brochure first.  I went to the office and took a picture of an old switchboard to use for the background, and the creativity just flowed from there.  I easily knocked out a first draft in two days.

I sent the brochure to the boss, and instead of just getting comments back an even more unlikely task was given to me.  He wanted me to work on their invoice layout—to make it “pretty.”  Now I am a more artsy person, and I definitely do not know what makes up an invoice nor have I had any experience with invoices; however, I knew I could probably help them with the “pretty” part.

Little did I know that not only would this be a new experience, but it would be a frustrating but revealing one as well.

The program I had to use to create these pretty invoices is TERRIBLE!  It is not intuitive and there seems to be no standard format.  Everything had to be created from scratch.  I spent the first day at the office just trying to figure out what everything meant.  Even the full-time employees in charge of billing and invoices didn’t know the program very well (once again because it is a terrible program).

Once I got working, I realized learning what things did was the least of my problems.  I found that once I moved one thing- even just one-space over-it changed everything around it A LOT.  The layout in the working format was not actually what the format looked like when you printed it.  Oh and there was no way to align things.  As is clearly evident from the above evidence, it is a TERRIBLE program.

On a particularly frustrating day, I took a break and talked to my dad.  I told him all my complaints and wined to him for about five minutes.  Then he said, “Well just think what you’ll be able to do with a good program.”  That made me realize that even though I complained a lot and got frustrated a lot, in about 3 weeks time I had overcome the program (well mostly, I am still working out a few little kinks in the layout).  During the process I had made a list of problems I couldn’t seem to figure out and that I was going to have to talk to one of the software’s tech supports about, but I never ended up making that call.

Lesson learned: Persistence and determination do pay off.  I didn’t want to have someone else tell me how to do it; I wanted to figure it out myself.  And even though I had to use a terrible program, the layout I created was what the client wanted (and they were impressed that I got the program to make what I showed them).

As a public relations/advertising practitioner, we have to strive to make the most out of what we are given, whether it is budget or clients or even software programs.   Also, we can use every opportunity that comes our way to not only increase experience but also reveal our strengths.

-Nicole Hangartner

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Samaritan’s Feet Turns to Butler Students for Social Media Plan: College of Communication students to aid global nonprofit

INDIANAPOLIS (June 29, 2010)—The Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) and Rise Innovations has been chosen to develop and implement the first social media plan for the globally known nonprofit, Samaritan’s Feet.  The plan will be developed to aid the “Barefoot Coaches” campaign this winter.

Samaritan’s Feet is a nonprofit organization founded by Emmanuel (Manny) Ohonme in 2003. Nigerian-born Ohonme was nine years old when he received a pair of shoes from a “Good Samaritan.” He created the organization with the goal to provide shoes to 10 million impoverished individuals in the next 10 years with a message of hope. Samaritan’s Feet collects shoes to be distributed around the world. Individuals receiving shoes are told a biblical story of faith, hope, and love while having their feet washed.

“Barefoot Coaches” started in 2008 when IUPUI men’s basketball coach, Ron Hunter, agreed to coach a game barefoot to raise awareness and collect shoes for Samaritan’s Feet. Hunter’s efforts encouraged other basketball coaches “to go barefoot” including Butler men’s basketball coach, Brad Stevens, who has participated the past two years. The campaign has received national press and thousands more college and high school coaches continue to join each year.

PRSSA and Rise Innovations were chosen for this project due to their close relationship with the city of Indianapolis and respected student programs.

“Samaritan’s Feet is thrilled to be partnering with the Butler University PRSSA and Rise Innovations to grow our influence among college campuses and universities,” said Ohonme. “We envision this project to be a student –created, student-developed, and student-implemented campaign providing real-world experience and nationwide recognition for both Butler University and Samaritan’s Feet.”

Ohonme continues, “with the support of both Butler University students and Butler Coach Brad Stevens, we anticipate expanding our impact nationwide, allowing us to increase the number of children in need who will benefit from new athletic shoes through Samaritan’s Feet.”

PRSSA and Rise Innovations plans to use various forms of social media such as Twitter, Facebook, blogs and podcasts as well as partner with the Butler community, city of Indianapolis and other campuses across the country.   Planning has already begun and program tactics will be introduced in fall 2010.

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About the Public Relations Society of America

Butler University’s chapter of the Public Relations Society of America is a pre-professional public relations organization designed to provide students with real communication experiences building on classroom teachings. PRSSA membership benefits include scholarships, networking, and opportunities to develop a professional portfolio.

Headquartered in New York City, the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) is the world’s pre-eminent, pre-professional public relations organization. Founded in 1968 by the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA), the organization has grown to more than 10,000 members at 300 Chapters across the United States and one Chapter in Argentina. PRSSA membership benefits include scholarships and awards as well as internships, jobs and professional development opportunities.

About Rise Innovations
Rise Innovations is a student run integrated marketing communications firm at Butler University founded in 2010 and is composed of students in Butler University’s Public Relations Student Society of America. Rise Innovations provides professional communications services to its clients, while furthering its members’ educations through real-life experiences. For more information, visit www.riseinnovations.com.

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Finding the “Wow”

I recently finished reading A Whole New Mind by Daniel Pink, a book that supports the notion that right-brained thinking is the way of future advancement in any industry.  Previously, (for the most part) the world has been ruled by analytical, straightforward thinkers.  It was those with knowledge of numbers or systems that made the world turn.  Pink insists that those predecessors have now paved the way for creative minds to flourish.

Pink separated the book into six different chapters, each highlighting a specific aspect of “R-directed” thinking. One chapter, specifically, stuck out to me.  It was titled “design.”  Pink explained that many companies have begun to recognize they are pretty much on pace with their competitors in terms of technology and advancement.  With similar innovation levels, price generally follows suit, so the difference amongst these competitors comes down to aesthetics.  Those products, atmospheres, or event marketing materials with the cleverest concepts or intriguing designs are the entities that remain in consumers’ minds.

After reading this chapter, I found myself noticing even the subtlest differences in design or approach.  One example that stands out was a restaurant I visited with my girlfriend and her parents a few weeks back.  I’d never visited or even noticed this hole-in-the wall establishment, but I’d go back in a heartbeat.  It was an Italian joint close to campus, and the following aspects made the ethic culture resonate much more than traditional restaurants.

  • It was SMALL and the tables were very close together. Now, I’m not Italian, but from what I hear, family is very important.  So at first, these close quarters seemed loud and inconvenient. But the more I thought about it, I realized it was part of the atmosphere.  It was by intentional design that this restaurant wanted people to feel a more intimate connection to the tables close by—almost like an extended family. 
  • They only served Italian wine and beer. This doesn’t take much explanation, but it was a nice touch and forced me try something new.  I enjoy trying new things, but this gave me that extra kick in the butt to make sure I would not order Bud Light.
  • We had unusual Parmesan cheese and red pepper shakers. I’ve never visited Italy, so this might be normal over there.  Instead of traditional cheese shakers, the Parmesan cheese and red pepper were in open containers with little wooden spoons used to sprinkle the contents over our pizza.  This really isn’t a huge deal, but my hat goes off to the employee who proposed that idea.  I can use normal shakers at Pizza Hut, so to me this small touch made my experience more authentic and memorable.

It’s been said before, but don’t settle for good ideas.  I’ve found myself trying to notice what makes designs different, why it was done that way, and how I can make my ideas more impactful.  What subtle examples of great design have you noticed?

-Ryan Pylipow

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